Synonyms for zhun or Related words with zhun

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Examples of "zhun"
Late in 318, when the Han Zhao emperor Liu Can was overthrown by his official Jin Zhun, Jin Zhun initially indicated that he was submitting to Emperor Yuan's authority, and Emperor Yuan tried to take advantage by sending an army to assist Jin Zhun. However, long before the army could get there, Jin Zhun was defeated by the new Han Zhao emperor Liu Yao and the general Shi Le.
Kou Zhun became a "jinshi" after passing the imperial examination in 979. Kou Zhun was a great speaker and had a reputation of offering criticism as he saw fit. Once, Emperor Taizong got offended and decided to leave, but Kou Zhun grabbed his robe and forced him to sit down and finish listening. Emperor Taizong remarked, "Having Kou Zhun is like Emperor Taizong of Tang having Wei Zheng."
Wang Qinruo, another Song official, was notably jealous of Kou Zhun and talked Emperor Zhenzong into distrusting Kou Zhun with words such as "Does my majesty know about gambling? When gamblers are about to lose everything, they take out all of their money for a last gamble. Kou Zhun was using your majesty as his stake (in that battle), which was incredibly dangerous." Soon Kou Zhun was banished from his post.
Huang Zhun has composed over forty film scores. Selected works include:
Liu Can (; died 318), courtesy name Shiguang (士光), Posthumous name (as given by Jin Zhun) Emperor Yin of Han (Zhao) (漢(趙)隱帝), was an emperor of the Xiongnu state Han Zhao, who reigned briefly in 318 before being killed by his trusted father-in-law Jin Zhun.
After Emperor Ming's death in 472, Liu Zhun's older brother Liu Yu the Crown Prince became emperor (as Emperor Houfei). Liu Zhun himself was made the governor of the important capital region, Yang Province (揚州, modern Zhejiang and southern Jiangsu), but actual governance was carried out by his staff members. In 474, after Liu Xiufan rebelled and sieged the capital Jiankang, the official Chu Cheng (褚澄), not knowing that assassins sent by Emperor Houfei's general Xiao Daocheng had already assassinated Liu Xiufan, seized Liu Zhun and surrendered Liu Zhun's headquarters to Liu Xiufan's army, claiming that Liu Xiufan had declared Liu Zhun to be his son. (Liu Xiufan himself made no such public declaration before his death.) However, when Liu Xiufan's army later found out that he was already dead, it collapsed, and Liu Zhun was not harmed.
Huang Zhun started his professional football career in 2008 when he joined Chongqing Lifan for the 2008 China League One campaign.
Xiao Daocheng created Liu Zhun the Prince of Ruyin and built him a mansion in the vicinity of the capital Jiankang, but put him under heavy guard. Less than a month after Xiao's taking of the throne, someone rode a horse near Liu Zhun's mansion, and the guards mistook the situation as someone wanting to seize Liu Zhun and start a rebellion, so they killed Liu Zhun themselves. Xiao not only did not punish them, but instead awarded them, and subsequently started a slaughter of the Liu clan. He did, however, bury the former emperor with imperial honors.
It is written as 准噶尔鸢尾 in Chinese script and known as "zhun ga er yuan wei" in China.
Huang Zhun (; born 27 January 1989) is a Qingdao, Shandong, Chinese footballer who currently plays for Guizhou Zhicheng in the China League One.
Fuyang is the birthplace of many notable people dating back to Three Kingdoms period, including Li Zongmian, Li Tiao, and Lin Zhun.
The fourth son of Yiping, Kuang Zhun (邝谆) had three sons. Ordered by their father to disperse and spread the family name, the second son of Kuang Zhun, Kuang Yisheng (邝一声) migrated to Kukang in Xinhui County, Guangdong where he became the ancestor of the Xinhui, Kaiping, and Taishan lineage of the Kuang family. Zhun's third son, Kuang Yijun (一俊), returned to the original home of the Kuang family in Guangdong, located in Dazhen, Nanhai County, Guangdong.
In 318, Liu Cong died and was succeeded by his son Liu Can. Shortly after, however, Liu Can was killed by his father-in-law Jin Zhun in a coup, and Jin slaughtered all members of the imperial Liu household in the capital Pingyang (平陽, in modern Linfen, Shanxi). Both Shi and Liu Yao, a cousin of Liu Cong, led their armies against Jin Zhun. Liu Yao declared himself emperor, and Shi decided, at that time, to submit to Liu Yao's authority. Liu Yao created him the Duke of Zhao. Subsequently, Jin Zhun, with his forces under pressure from two sides, was assassinated and succeeded by his cousin Jin Ming (靳明), who abandoned Pingyang and surrendered to Liu Yao. Shi entered the capital but did not occupy it. Shi Le burned palaces in Pingyang. With the capital heavily damaged by the coup and the subsequent battles, Liu Yao moved the capital to Chang'an.
Gu Zhun (; 1915–1974) was a Chinese intellectual, economist and pioneer of post-Marxist Chinese liberalism. A victim of "anti-Rightist" purges, he spent his later life in prisons and reeducation centres.
He was associated with the career of pioneer post-Marxist Chinese liberal Gu Zhun, acting as the latter's protector during anti-Rightist purges to which he himself was eventually to succumb.
Li Zhun (; 4 July 1928 - 2 February 2000) was a Chinese novelist who was the vice president of China Writers Association and the librarian of Chinese Modern Literature Museum.
Kou Zhun ( 961 – 24 October 1023), courtesy name Pingzhong, was a much-praised official in ancient China's Northern Song Dynasty. He was the chancellor from 1004 to 1006 during Emperor Zhenzong's reign.
Kuang Zhun (鄺諄), Kuang Yiping's fourth son, won the imperial examinations in AD 1142. In 1146, he received his commission and in 1152, is appointed the administrative governor of "Anching" in "Lin'an" (臨安京城), a Song Dynasty capital. In 1168, he was named the Advisor to the Crown Prince (); the imperial inspector of the emperor's dining (); and the rank of nobility and peerage and remained the governor of Lin'an for 60 years. Zhun's wives, "He" and "Feng", were named noble women (一品夫人) at the same time. In AD 1217, the Mongol army invaded the Song and Kuang Zhun ventured north to Yunjing to lead the defense against the Mongols. In AD 1218, Zhun resigned from the court and moves his entire clan back to Heyuan County, Huizhou, Guangdong. He died in AD 1219 of exhaustion. His eldest son, Kuang Yiyuan (鄺一元), remained in Huizhou to guard Zhun's grave until his death.
He Fani's father He Zhun (何準) was a brother of the one-time prime minister He Chong (何充), who was an important official during the reigns of Emperor Cheng, Emperor Kang, and Emperor Mu. He Zhun had already died by 357, when, based on the account of her high birth, He Fani was selected to be the empress. (Because her father was already deceased, the edict was issued to her father's cousin He Qi (何琦), as the head of the household.) Emperor Mu was 14 and she was 18.
Jin Zhun, however, planned to overthrow Liu Can. He advised Liu Can to kill a number of his brothers and high-level officials under suspicion of treason, and when Liu Can initially would not, Empress Jin and her sister Jin Yuehua the empress dowager persuaded him that Jin Zhun was telling the truth. After those high-level officials were killed, Jin then killed Liu Can and massacred the imperial Liu clan. Later that year, Jin was assassinated and succeeded by his cousin Jin Ming (靳明), who, along with the rest of the Jin clan, were slaughtered by the succeeding emperor Liu Yao. It is not known what Empress Jin's fate was.